Georgia’s high schools of 1949-50

Here’s a simple list: Georgia’s white high schools of 1949-50.

Currently, there is not a cumulative list freely available on the internet prior to 1960. The Georgia High School Association, citing the number of consolidations taking place in the 1950s, declined to publish region lists. Not that region lists were cumulative as in that era, there were a number of unaccredited high schools. Depending on year, the GHSA frowned upon its member schools playing non-accredited schools in the state, or at times, ignored it happening.

The methodology of this list was copying down the number of four-year public high schools per each listed school system in the Seventy-Eighth and Seventy-Ninth Annual Reports  of the Department of Education to the General Assembly of the State of Georgia.

Accredited high schools were applied to the list from the 1949-50 Georgia Educational Directory. At that time, the directory did not print what grades each school housed. Accredited high schools were listed in all caps.

Fortunately, much is known of school systems of that era to add in nearly all unaccredited high schools. We know all nine of Gordon County’s county schools and that Walker County was operating minuscule high schools at Cedar Grove and West Armuchee.

Unfortunately, not enough is known about Georgia’s African-American schools to attempt that list. The Annual Reports said there were 289 four-year black high schools in the year ending June 1950 (there were 482 white four-year public high schools). Sources are few and far between, especially for a rural county like Meriwether, which was said to have nine public African-American four-year high schools.

The stats from the Annual Reports almost assuredly contain a handful of errors. Glascock County, for example, was credited with two white high schools.

There were four schools in Glascock County in 1949-50, according to the Department of Education’s Educational Directory of the same year: Gibson, Bastonville, Edgehill and Mitchell. Gibson, of course, being the county seat and the biggest town in the county, had an all-grades 13-teacher school and was accredited as a high school by the state. The directory specifically labels Bastonville and Mitchell as junior high schools. Though not labeled, Edgehill was smaller than the two of those, at four teachers.

Any system number starred is one I feel the number is not correct.  Some likely had fewer schools. Some, like Cobb County, probably had more high schools than the list credited. If the asterisk appears by a school, it means I am not sure if the school was indeed a high school. Rather, it’s an educated guess.

In another note, the Annual Reports were not always consistent with breaking school systems into county and city. For example, Statesboro and Vienna were separate school systems than Bulloch and Dooly counties, respectively, but were included with them.

  • Appling (2) – Baxley, Surrency
  • Atkinson (2) – Pearson, Willacoochee
  • Bacon (1) – Bacon County
  • Baker (1) – Baker County
  • Baldwin (3) – Georgia Military College, Midway Vocational, Peabody
  • Banks (4) – Banks County, Davis Academy, Gillsville, Hickory Flat*
  • Barrow (1) – Statham
  • Bartow (4) – Adairsville, Cass, Pine Log, Taylorsville
  • Ben Hill (1) – Fitzgerald
  • Berrien (5) – Alapaha, Enigma, Nashville, Poplar Springs, Ray City
  • Bibb (3) – Lanier, Macon Vocational, A.L. Miller
  • Bleckley (1) – Cochran
  • Brantley (2) – Hoboken, Nahunta
  • Brooks (4) – Barwick, Dixie, Morven, Quitman
  • Bryan (2) – Bryan County, Richmond Hill
  • Bulloch (7) – Brooklet, Laboratory School, Nevils, Portal, Register, Statesboro, Stilson
  • Burke (4) – Girard, Midville, Sardis, Waynesboro
  • Butts (1) – Jackson
  • Calhoun (3) – Arlington, Edison, Morgan
  • Camden (2) – Camden County, South Camden
  • Candler (2) – Metter, Pulaski
  • Carroll (6) – Bowdon, Mount Zion, Roopville, Temple, Villa Rica, Whitesburg
  • Catoosa (2) – Lakeview, Ringgold
  • Charlton (2) – Charlton County, St. George
  • Chatham (2) – Commercial, Savannah
  • Chattahoochee (1) – Cusseta
  • Chattooga (5) – Gore, Lyerly, Menlo, Subligna, Summerville
  • Cherokee (2) – Canton, Woodstock
  • Clarke (2) – University Demonstration, Winterville
  • Clay (1) – Clay County
  • Clayton (3) – Forest Park, Jonesboro, North Clayton
  • Clinch (1) – Homerville
  • Cobb (8*) – Acworth, Austell, Fitzhugh Lee, Kennesaw, Mableton, McEachern, R.L. Osborne, Powder Springs, Smyrna. Nine schools.
  • Coffee (6) – Ambrose, Broxton, Douglas, Nicholls, Satilla, West Green
  • Colquitt (2) – Doerun, Norman Park
  • Columbia (3) – Evans, Harlem, Leah
  • Cook (1) – Cook
  • Coweta (4) – East Coweta, Grantville, Newnan, Western
  • Crawford (1) – Crawford County
  • Crisp (3) – Arabi, East Crisp, West Crisp
  • Dade (2) – Dade, Davis
  • Dawson (1) – Dawson County
  • Decatur (7) – Attapulgus, Bainbridge, Brinson*, Climax, Faceville*, Mount Pleasant, West Bainbridge
  • DeKalb (8) – Avondale, Chamblee, Clarkston, Druid Hills, Lithonia, Southwest DeKalb, Stone Mountain, Tucker
  • Dodge (5) – Chauncey, Chester, Dodge High, Eastman, Rhine
  • Dooly (5) – Byromville, Dooly High, Pinehurst, Unadilla, Vienna
  • Dougherty (0)
  • Douglas (1) – Douglas County
  • Early (4) – Blakely-Union, Damascus, Hilton, Jakin
  • Echols (1) – Echols County
  • Effingham (5) – Clyo, Effingham Academy, Guyton, Marlow, Rincon
  • Elbert (2) – Bowman, Nancy Hart Memorial
  • Emanuel (6) – Adrian, Emanuel County Institute, Garfield, Oak Park, Summertown, Swainsboro
  • Evans (1) – Claxton
  • Fannin (4) – Blue Ridge, Epworth, Fannin County, McCaysville
  • Fayette (1) – Fayette County
  • Floyd (6*) – Armuchee, Cave Spring, Coosa, Johnson, McHenry, Model, Pepperell. Seven schools.
  • Forsyth (2) – Chestatee, Cumming
  • Franklin (3) – Franklin County, Lavonia, Royston
  • Fulton (9) – Campbell, College Park, Fulton, Hapeville, Milton, North Fulton, Northside, Russell, West Fulton
  • Gilmer (1) – Ellijay
  • Glascock (2*) – Gibson. No other high schools.
  • Glynn (1) – Glynn Academy
  • Gordon (9) – Belwood, Fairmount, Liberty, Oostanaula, Plainville, Red Bud, Resaca, Sonoraville, Sugar Valley
  • Grady (2) – Cairo, Whigham
  • Greene (2) – Greensboro, Union Point
  • Gwinnett (11) – Bethesda, Buford, Dacula, Duluth, Grayson, Lawrenceville, Lilburn, Norcross, Snellville, Sugar Hill, Suwanee
  • Habersham (4) – Baldwin, Clarkesville, Cornelia, Demorest
  • Hall (10) – Air Line, Chattahoochee, Flowery Branch, Lyman Hall, Lula, Murrayville*, Oakwood, River Bend, Sardis (and unknown)
  • Hancock (1) – Sparta
  • Haralson (5) – Bremen, Buchanan, Tallapoosa, Waco (and unknown).
  • Harris (4) – Chipley, Hamilton, Mountain Hill, Waverly Hall
  • Hart (1) – Hartwell
  • Heard (2) – Centralhatchee, Franklin
  • Henry (2) – Hampton, McDonough
  • Houston (2) – Perry, Warner Robins
  • Irwin (3) – Irwinville, Mystic, Ocilla
  • Jackson (5) – Benton, Braselton, Commerce, Jefferson, Maysville
  • Jasper (1) – Monticello
  • Jeff Davis (1) – Jeff Davis
  • Jefferson (6) – Avera, Bartow, Louisville, Stapleton, Wadley, Wrens
  • Jenkins (1) – Millen
  • Johnson (2) – Kite, Wrightsville
  • Jones (1) – Jones County
  • Lamar (1) – Milner
  • Lanier (1) – Lanier County
  • Laurens (10) – Brewton, Cadwell, Cedar Grove, Condor, Dexter, Dublin, Dudley, Lowery, Rentz, Wilkes
  • Lee (1) – Lee County
  • Liberty (1) – Bradwell Institute
  • Lincoln (1) – Lincolnton
  • Long (1) – Ludowici
  • Lowndes (6) – Clyattville, Hahira, Lake Park, Naylor, Pine Grove, Valdosta
  • Lumpkin (1) – Lumpkin County
  • Macon (4) – Ideal, Marshallville, Montezuma, Oglethorpe
  • Madison (4) – Colbert, Comer, Danielsville, Ila
  • Marion (1) – Buena Vista
  • McDuffie (2) – Dearing, Thomson
  • McIntosh (1) – Darien
  • Meriwether (4) – Greenville, Luthersville, Manchester, Woodbury
  • Miller (1) – Miller County
  • Mitchell (4) – Hopeful, Mitchell County, Pelham, Sale City
  • Monroe (1) – Mary Persons
  • Montgomery (2) – Montgomery County, Mt. Vernon-Ailey
  • Morgan (1) – Morgan County
  • Murray (1) – Murray County
  • Muscogee (3) – Baker, Columbus, Jordan
  • Newton (1) – Newton County
  • Oconee (2) – Bogart, Oconee County
  • Oglethorpe (2*) – Oglethorpe County. Oglethorpe County was the only high school.
  • Paulding (2) – Dallas, Hiram
  • Peach (2) – Byron, Fort Valley
  • Pickens (2) – Pickens County, Tate
  • Pierce (2) – Blackshear, Patterson
  • Pike (2) – Concord-Molena, Zebulon
  • Polk (1) – Rockmart
  • Pulaski (1) – Hawkinsville
  • Putnam (1) – Eatonton
  • Quitman (1) – Georgetown
  • Rabun (3) – Lakemont, Rabun County, Rabun Gap
  • Randolph (2) – Cuthbert, Shellman
  • Richmond (3) – Hephzibah, Richmond Academy, Tubman
  • Rockdale (1) – Conyers
  • Schley (1) – Schley County
  • Screven (5*) – Bay Branch, Hilltonia, Jackson, Newington, Rocky Ford, Sylvania. Six high schools.
  • Seminole (1) – Seminole County
  • Spalding (1) – Spalding
  • Stephens (2) – Stephens County, Toccoa
  • Stewart (2) – Richland, Stewart County
  • Sumter (2) – Plains, Union
  • Talbot (1) – Talbot County
  • Taliaferro (1) – Alexander Stephens Institute
  • Tattnall (3) – Collins, Glennville, Reidsville
  • Taylor (2) – Butler, Reynolds
  • Telfair (5) – Lumber City, McRae-Helena, Milan, Ocmulgee, Workmore
  • Terrell (1) – Terrell
  • Thomas (5) – Boston, Coolidge, Meigs, Ochlocknee, Pavo
  • Tift (2) – Omega, Tifton
  • Toombs (3) – Lyons, Toombs Central, Vidalia
  • Towns (1) – Towns County
  • Treutlen (1) – Treutlen
  • Troup (4) – Center, Gray Hill, Rosemont, (Hillcrest or Mountville)
  • Turner (3) – Ashburn, Rebecca, Sycamore
  • Twiggs (3) – Smith, Twiggs, Twiggs-Wilkinson
  • Union (2) – Union County, Woody Gap
  • Upson (1) – Yatesville
  • Walker (6*) – Cedar Grove, Chattanooga Valley, LaFayette, Rossville, West Armuchee. Likely only five high schools.
  • Walton (3) – Loganville, Monroe, Social Circle
  • Ware (4) – Manor, Wacona, Waresboro, Waycross
  • Warren (1) – Warrenton
  • Washington (4) – Davisboro, Harrison, Sandersville, Tennille
  • Wayne (3) – Odum, Screven, Wayne County
  • Webster (1) – Webster County
  • Wheeler (4*) – Glenwood, Shiloh, Wheeler County. Likely just three high schools.
  • White (2) – Cleveland, Nacoochee
  • Whitfield (7) – Cohutta, Dawnville, Pleasant Grove, Tunnel Hill, Valley Point, Varnell, Westside
  • Wilcox (4) – Abbeville, Pineview, Pitts, Rochelle
  • Wilkes (2) – Tignall, Washington
  • Wilkinson (4) – Gordon, Irwinton, Toomsboro, Twiggs-Wilkinson
  • Worth (4) – Bridgeboro, Sumner, Sylvester, Warwick
  • Albany (1) – Albany
  • Americus (1) – Americus
  • Athens (2*) – Athens. Probably just one high school.
  • Atlanta (9) – Bass, Brown, Central Night, Grady, Murphy, O’Keefe, Roosevelt, Smith, Sylvan
  • Barnesville (1) – Gordon Military
  • Calhoun city (1) – Calhoun
  • Carrollton (1) – Carrollton
  • Cartersville (1) – Cartersville
  • Cedartown (1) – Cedartown
  • Chickamauga (1) – Gordon Lee
  • Cordele (1) – Cordele
  • Dalton (1) – Dalton
  • Decatur city (2) – Decatur Boys, Decatur Girls
  • Elberton (1) – Elberton
  • Gainesville (1) – Gainesville
  • Griffin (1) – Griffin
  • Hogansville (1) – Hogansville
  • LaGrange (1) – LaGrange
  • Marietta (1) – Marietta
  • Moultrie (1) – Moultrie
  • Rome (2*) – Rome. Likely one high school as Georgia School for the Deaf and Berry both called private.
  • Tallulah Falls (1) – Tallulah Falls
  • Thomaston (1) – R.E. Lee
  • Thomasville (1) – Thomasville
  • Toccoa (1) – Toccoa
  • Trion (1) – Trion
  • West Point (1) – West Point
  • Winder (1) – Winder
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Indefensible: Schools closing after winning state basketball titles

A wide variety of Georgia high schools have won state basketball championships.

The GIAA began state tournaments for its league in 1922 and the official Georgia High School Association championships started in 1926. (For reasons unknown the GHSA does not list the 1926-37 champions on its site.)

Of course, in nearly 100 years of tournaments, not all schools are still standing.

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A good area: Bonaire High, football and the rise of Warner Robins

Houston County is seemingly perpetually growing.

The United States census gives credence to that. Starting with the 1940 census, Houston County has grown in every count. The county had 110,765 people in 2000, a growth from 89,208 in 1990. In 2010, the number was 139,900. Currently, the figure is estimated at 152,122.

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The new schools Terrell County did not welcome

When the Minimum Foundation Program was ratified in 1951, most Georgia school systems were thrilled.

State-provided money to bring local schools to modern condition. Many systems immediately pursued the funds, eagerly conducting surveys to determine the needs and problems of their schools.

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For the honor of being called Lanier

This blog recently told the story of Morgan-Leary, a high school that only lasted three months under its name. The school previously had been known as Calhoun and in 1957 and after three months as Morgan-Leary, changed its name to Morgan (which had been the school’s name until the 1953-54 school year).

An even shorter-lived school name has popped up: Pearl Stephens High.

Its brief existence is probably not a record, either, considering some of the upheaval in Georgia’s educational system.

More than one school in the state has bore the name of Pearl Stephens High School. The one for this story existed in Macon in 1924.

Macon had a complicated history of high schools in the 1910s-20s.

Gresham was the city’s main white high school until 1909, when a new school opened at Forsyth and Orange streets. This new high school would only share honors as being the main high school, though, as education was split into boys and girls high schools.

The new boys high school either did not have a name or retained the name of Gresham (split across two sites) until September 1910, when it took the name of Lanier, named for poet Sidney Lanier.

Almost immediately, both schools were overcrowded. In November 1912, the board of education decided to expand the Lanier site for boys and girls high schools and turn Gresham into a grammar school.

While the new Lanier was under construction, the board temporarily relieved some of the overcrowding at the site by creating double sessions at the Gresham girls high school and briefly returning it to a coeducational status.

The expanded Lanier of 1913 was coed and remained that way until changes in 1924 when the boys of Lanier were moved to a new building.

Lanier Girls

A postcard of Lanier High for Girls. It was the name female students in Macon preferred, but the honor of being Lanier High for Girls was only achieved by protests.

The new boys site was immediately christened Lanier. But what to do with the girls?

The Bibb Board of Education thought it had a perfect solution, which it announced at a September 11 meeting.

“Bibb County’s new high school for boys was yesterday named Lanier High School and the institution which has borne that name and is now to be used exclusively for girls was named Pearl Stephens High School, at the September meeting of the Board of Education held yesterday at the courthouse.”

The late Miss Stephens was a well known educator in the city schools for more than 35 years.

Keeping the boys school at Lanier was a source of pride for the boys and it was agreed to retain the name. Protests to the Stephens name were dismissed.

At that time, the board did not seem to recognize how important the Lanier name was for the girls as well, despite letters before the change.

When rumors of the new name were circulating in late August, a Lanier alumnus named Helen Shaw Harrold wrote the Macon Telegraph a letter about why she wanted the old name kept:

“Most of the letters have favored the idea of taking the name ‘Lanier’ from the building to which it rightly belongs, or giving it to the boys and of renaming the real ‘Lanier,’ ‘Pearl Stephens High School.’ Against this idea I do earnestly protest as do a great many, who, however, have not expressed themselves. I have nothing against the memory of Miss Pearl — she was fine — but it just seems foolish to me that the name should be taken from the school to which it belongs. As a matter of fact, when Miss Pearl taught at the high school she taught intermediate boys.”

It wasn’t just Stephens’ name seemingly being only significant to male students that Harrold protested, it was the lack of recognition given to the accomplishments of female students.

“The main contention of those would would take the name from us and give it to the boys is that the boys have won so many honors on the drill and athletic field while the girls have done nothing? Why haven’t they? Because the girls have never been allowed to have school teams in any sport at all. They have never been allowed to play on any basketball court except in the inadequate, unequipped, dark gymnasium in the basement of the school. There is good material among the girls which put together and with the proper instruction and coaching would make fine teams. Other high schools in the State, some of which are larger while others are smaller, have supported teams for boys and girls alike. Why can’t we?

“So much for athletics. A school cannot live off of that alone. In the field of scholarship, which have been the more faithful to their books, the girls or the boys? The girls, every time. Each month when the honor roll was published, the girls outnumbered the boys by a large majority.”

(White girls in Bibb County schools would not be allowed to play competitive high school basketball until 1970.)

Harrold suggested naming the new school Lanier High for Girls.

After the name change, even more letters of protest went to the Telegraph. One described the movement going on at the school.

“For a while there were indignant discussions and marked resentment at the idea of another name,” said Margaret Long on September 24.  “Now some of the girls wear black ribbons ‘in loving memory of the deceased Lanier High School.’ Others, maybe a little defiantly, are wearing orange and green ribbons on their shoulders.”

Long said the movement was not about Pearl Stephens, but about their love of Lanier.

“There is probably not a girl at ‘Pearl Stephens School’ who does not admire and respect this wonderful woman and honor her memory. But there are others who have taught at long as Miss Stephens and done as much good. For instance, Miss Clara Smith taught for forty-four years and is one of the most wonderfully beloved women in Macon. Miss Clara was not only loved devotedly by everyone who was fortunate enough to have her as a teacher but everyone of her acquaintance.

“Of course, Lanier couldn’t be named for more than one teacher and as there are more than one who are worthy of the honor, why not please the girls to whom it would mean so much to have for the name of their school, ‘Lanier Girls’ High’?”

The protests finally struck with the board of education, especially a petition with 1,000 signatures. On October 9, the girls school was granted its old Lanier name, but the decision was not unanimous.

J. Ellsworth Hall was the most vocal of the opponents.

““This whole thing has been assiduously worked up,” Hall said. “These girls do not know what they want. I can take a petition before them tomorrow morning and get every one of them to sign it.”

T.D. Tinsley asked that the board not acknowledge the petition at all. He lost that vote, 7-5.

Macon mayor Luther Williams urged that Stephens be honored with another school. Stephens’ family had previously blessed the naming of the high school in her honor.

Despite opposition, Pearl Stephens was again Lanier.

The name stayed six more years, when a new girls high was built.

In 1930, when the building was under construction, the school was given the name A.L. Miller.

There were again letters of protest against a name change, but this time the board stuck with its decision. Miller High it was when it opened in 1931 and Miller High it remained until Macon’s massive integration and coeducational high school shuffle of 1970.

The Bibb County Board of Education did find a way to honor Stephens; an elementary school was named in her honor. The Facebook group, We Attended Pearl Stephens Elementary in Macon, GA, pegs the school’s dates as 1929-90. Pearl Stephens Elementary was turned into senior housing, Pearl Stephens Village, in 2008.

(Note: The Pearl Stephens school in Warner Robins, which was an African-American high school through the 1969-70 school year, was named for a different Pearl Stephens.)

Sources: Macon Telegraph – Sept. 27, 1910, June 6, 1912, Nov. 21, 1912, May 9, 1913, Aug. 28, 1924, Sept. 12, 1924, Oct. 10, 1924, Dec. 12, 1930, Jan. 4, 2017;  National Register of Historical Places Registration Form for A.L. Miller buildings

A school name too difficult

You probably have not heard of Morgan-Leary High School.

Its existence is only  noted in a single one of Georgia’s educational directories, the 1957-58 edition. Its actual life was even shorter.

Morgan-Leary is likely one of the shortest-lived high schools in Georgia’s history.

Under its name, the school only lasted three months. The reason for changing it was one of the stranger decisions in state school history, too – Morgan-Leary was too cumbersome.

Morgan-Leary, located in Morgan, was named August 14, 1957 at a Calhoun County Board of Education meeting. It was renamed at another Calhoun County board meeting to Morgan High November 13, 1957.

The reason behind the change was explained by the Calhoun County Board of Education in the November 22 Calhoun County News:

“Upon suggestion of the board members from the Morgan district, a motion was made with concurrence from the Leary board member to change the name of the Morgan-Leary High School back to its original Morgan High School. Explanation revealed the name Morgan-Leary High School was impractical because of its length.”

Morgan-Leary was not even the most complicated name in the state at that time; Sardis-Girard-Alexander, which existed from 1952-87 (or 1954-87) in Burke County had two hyphens and three towns and communities incorporated into its name. And there was also Newnan-Coweta County Central High, though that was nearly universally referred to as Newnan Central.

Morgan-Leary was a name change from Calhoun High. Not to be confused with the city of Calhoun, whose high school held the same name, this Calhoun High had adopted the moniker in 1953, when Calhoun County was seemingly on the cusp of consolidation.

Edison and Morgan were going to consolidate in 1953, with the high school at Morgan. Everything looked ready to go, until the state of Georgia intervened.

No public hearing had been set up in Edison, the state said. Five years later, the state would rule similarly when Cleveland and Nacoochee high schools were kept from consolidating in White County.

High schools in Edison and Morgan went back to their previous status. Morgan kept the name Calhoun.

White County was delayed in 1958 and consolidated in 1959. The opposite happened in Calhoun County where instead of being a temporary delay, consolidation turned into a war.

In 1955, Arlington and Edison refused to consolidate and Calhoun County maintained three white high schools for three more years, with the second Morgan High existing for less than one year.

On February 12, 1958, the Calhoun County Board voted for Morgan High’s students to go to Edison for the 1958-59 school year. In return, Edison sent its middle school students to Morgan.

Morgan’s status as a junior high only lasted until 1968, according to the Georgia Educational Directory. The school closed completely that year, with the only school remaining in the town the all-grades segregated school, H.T. Singleton.

Arlington and Edison were gone by then as high schools.

Low attendance caught up with them and the Calhoun County BOE voted to consolidate both in September 1962, with the two coming together in 1963 when a new high school building opened in Edison.

Sources: The Calhoun County News – Aug. 21, 1953, Sept. 2, 1955, Aug. 23, 1957, Nov. 22, 1957, Feb. 28, 1958, Sept. 20, 1962; Georgia Educational Directory – 1953-54, 1957-58, 1958-59, 1967-68.

1949: Clay County High created

Clay County became one of the earlier Georgia school systems to consolidate down to one high school in 1949, when a ruling from the state made it the only solution.

The Clay County board decided May 17, 1949 to join Bluffton and Fort Gaines high schools together.

“The section was taken with some apparent hesitation by the board after public hearings at the courthouse Tuesday morning had revealed the step as one to be taken only because of curtailed allotments from the state,” said Fort Gaines’ News Record on May 19.

The state, said The News Record, had cut their allotment of teachers by four. Bluffton elementary was entitled to three, the elementary at Fort Gaines to six and the consolidated high school earned four.

Elementaries were kept in both cities. The new high school was  housed in that building in Fort Gaines.

Clay’s board said it reserved the right to break up the monopoly on high school education if the situation ever bettered. It never seemed to do so, though conditions did not get worse.

When requesting money from the State School Building Authority in 1952, all Clay County High wanted was a vocational building, which at most cost $68,500.

Little changed at Clay until total integration in 1970, with students from A. Speight coming in. Clay County High combined with Randolph County in 1980 and as Randolph-Clay survives as the last of Georgia’s five post-total integration multi-county high school educational attempts.

Sources: The News Record – May 19, 1949, Aug. 21, 1952, Nov. 26, 1953