Counties not Tooke

The state of Georgia is the 21st largest in the United States of America based on land area. It is the largest state by land area east of the Mississippi River.

Despite the fact there are 20 states in America larger than Georgia, the state rockets up to No. 2 in another category: counties.

There are 159 counties in Georgia. At its peak – 1924-32 – there were 161 counties. Only Texas is more ridiculous in county numbers. The Lone Star State has 254 of them.

Georgia was always plentiful in counties.

The state broke the 100- [extant] county mark in 1853. No. 130 came in 1859. Then, with the Civil War and Reconstruction, money and expansion weren’t as plentiful. New counties cooled off, with No. 135, Oconee County’s formation in 1875, the last for 30 years.

But more came.

Railroads finally fully invaded the state (save for Heard County) and with populations rapidly expanding along these rails, a good many new towns rose. The towns of Ocilla, Metter and Baxley owed much thanks to trains.

With these rising towns, there were pressures. Pressures to move small county seats to the boom towns and in many instances, pressures to make these boom towns not only seats of government, but seats of government in empires specially carved out for them.

Some new counties were embraced, others were resisted. A statewide campaign ensued to attempt to prevent the formation of Peach County. By then, the state was having to use congressional amendments to approve them, such as in the case of Lanier County, which was created in 1920.

While we know of the successful counties to spring up, there were a good many failures.

Atkinson County was proposed in 1905 and 1911, with Alma as the county seat.

Alma became the seat of the new Bacon County in 1914 and the Atkinson name went to a new county formed around Pearson in 1917.

Listed below are a slew of counties that were considered at one point. These counties were organized enough to the point of having a name proposed with them.

This is not comprehensive, but instead a search of newspaper archives across the state and the inexact bounty that scans of papers 100+ years old can bring.

Note: A listing of “House” or “Senate” preceding a description means the proposed county was brought up in state representatives’ official discussions.

AIKEN

“Another of the new county bills has been introduced in the house. Representative Burney, of Morgan, fathering it. This is to create Aiken county from parts of Appling, Pierce, Ware and Coffee counties. The Waycross board of trade has gone on record as opposed to this bill, Waycross being the county seat of Ware county. Citizens of Alma and vicinity in Appling county are behind this movement.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 22, 1911

Proposal to create was read in the House of Representatives.
– Atlanta Georgian and News, Aug. 18, 1911

ALATOONA

“Also, Mr. McDonald, of Murray, has introduced a bill to form a new county from portions of Cass, Cobb, Cherokee and Paulding – Acworth to be the county site and Alatoona to be the name of the county.”
– Cassville Standard, Nov. 24, 1859

Alatoona is one of two proposed counties from Cass mentioned. In response, the Standard said in the same issue:
“We are confident that nineteen twentieths of the people of Cass are bitterly opposed to having their county cut up into such fragments as the above bills propose. We do not wonder what the discontents in the adjoining counties want a portion of our county – a county having the wealth, intelligence and population that Cass has, may be justly envied. Our people are satisfied with their county; we have got a voting population of twenty-one or twenty-two hundred, a total population of nearly sixteen thousand, and taxable property to the amount of nearly nine millions of dollars. Is it surprising that Cass is wanted? we think not; and our people will not permit their county to be cut up into strips not larger than a good-sized plantation.”

ANDERSON

Senate
Afternoon Session
“The bill to make a new county out of portions of Cass, Floyd and Polk, to be called Anderson. Lost.”
– Cassville Standard, Dec. 17, 1857

ASHBY

“The Valdosta Times learns that at the coming session of the Georgia Legislature an effort will be made to form a new county, from portions of the counties of Wayne and Appling, with Jessup [sic] as the county site. It is proposed to call the county Ashby, after the lamented General Ashby of Virginia fame.”
– North Georgia Citizen, June 16, 1870

Note: If true, why would Jesup, the county seat of Wayne County be looking for a new home in 1870? Possibly because it wasn’t the county seat. The 1800s history of Wayne County’s exact seat of government is a bit of a mess. Jesup, a railroad town, was voted the seat of government in 1873.

ATKINSON

“Alma on the Atlantic & Birmingham, between Offerman and Nicholls, is to be the county seat of Atkinson county.”
– Waycross Evening Herald, Aug. 12, 1905

“Citizens on the Southern portion of Appling county have inaugurated a movement for the creation, by the legislature, at the summer session, of a new county, to be known as Atkinson. They propose to incorporate in it that portion of Appling county south of the Little Satillo [sic] river, the northwest corner of Pierce county and a portion of the north end of Ware county. Alma is the town proposed for the new county seat. It has a population of 458 and is the largest town in the territory.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, May 30, 1911

AXSON

Axson’s name would have been in honor of Ellen Axson, the first wife of President Woodrow Wilson. She was a Georgia native and had died in 1914.

“The proposed new county of Axson would be composed of parts of lower Coffee and upper Clinch counties, and those who are working for the change, say they are confident of favorable action. They declare they have been planning for the change for ten years past.”
– Daily Times Enterprise (Thomasville), June 17, 1915

“The fight between Axson and Atkinson counties, both new, was compromised by taking the territory and county site of the proposed Axson and the name Atkinson. The county site will be Pearson. Berrien county fought the proposition seeking to take off the territory west of the Willacoochee.”
– Tifton Gazette, July 23, 1915

BEN HILL

Proposed name of county proposed with Buford as county seat. Mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner.

Proposed New Counties
“Ben Hill – Of Gwinnett and Hall.”
– Macon Telegraph, July 23, 1905

BLACKSHEAR

“The other proposed new counties, Blackshear, with Scott as its county seat; Cleveland, with Soperton as its county seat, and Georgia, with Metter as its county seat, do not ask so much of Emanuel.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 6, 1908

BLECKLEY

Toccoa proposing it as their county name mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner.

“Stephens county (applied for in the name of Bleckley) with Toccoa as the county site, to be formed from Habersham and Franklin.”
– Vienna News, Aug. 11, 1905

“Alma, Ga. June 8. – A very enthusiastic meeting of citizens of Alma and vicinity was held today in the Chamber of Commerce hall and was well attended by the citizens from the different sections of the proposed “New county of Bleckley.”
– Waycross Journal, June 9, 1911

BRANTLEY

Proposed New Counties
“Brantley – Of Coffee, Ware and Clinch.”
– Macon Telegraph, July 23, 1905

“In speaking of the proposed new counties in this section, the Herald neglected to state that Pearson, on the B. & W. would be the county seat of Brantley county if that county is made.”
– Waycross Evening Herald, Aug. 5, 1905

BUTLER

“A bill to lay out a new county from Fayette and Henry, to be called Butler. Lost.”
– Cassville Standard, Dec. 10, 1857

CANDLER

Proposed county to be carved out of Worth, Colquitt and Mitchell with Doerun as county seat. Doerun had proposed the name of Stephens, but backed off when they noticed that Winder had claimed the name. Mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner.

CLEVELAND

“The other proposed new counties, Blackshear, with Scott as its county seat; Cleveland, with Soperton as its county seat, and Georgia, with Metter as its county seat, do not ask so much of Emanuel.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 6, 1908

“The total proposed area is 404 square miles, of which 185 square miles will be taken from Emanuel, 10 from Johnson, 160 from Montgomery and 49 from Laurens. The new county will include taxable property of $2,500,00 and a population of 17,500. The important towns of Dublin, Swainsboro, Wrightsville, Mount Vernon and Adrian are all situated within a radius of less than 30 miles from the proposed county seat, Soperton.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 8, 1909

COMER

To have been named for Hugh M. Comer, a deceased president of the Central of Georgia railway. The land would have been taken out of Burke and Screven counties, with Sardis as the county seat.

Alexander in Burke County and Hilltonia in Screven would have been included within its boundaries.

“The territory of the proposed new county will embrace all of the 17,000 acres of land on the famous Come plantation, part of which is in Burke and part in Screven county. The population of the new county will be approximately 10,000. The territory taken from Screven county will be relatively small. Most of the proposed new county will be taken from Burke, which is one of the largest counties in the state at the present time.
– The Banner-Herald, March 23, 1923

COOK

“Senator Bloodworth has introduced a bill in the Senate which seeks to create a new county from sections of Pike and Monroe and is making every effort to have it named Phil Cook, in honor of the father of the present secretary of state.”
– Waycross Evening Herald, July 21, 1906

“The county, including western Monroe and eastern Pike, embraces a territory twelve by fifteen miles with Barnesville as its center.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, June 27, 1907

COOPER

Legislative
“By Mr. Fulmore of Cass – A bill to lay out a new county from Cass, to be called Cooper county.”
– Cassville Standard, Nov. 18, 1858

COOSA

Bills Reported
“A bill to create a new county from the county of Cass. Also a bill to create a new county from the counties of Floyd and Chattooga, to be called ‘Coosa.'”
– Federal Union (Milledgeville), Jan. 24, 1854

Senate
Afternoon Session

“The Committee reported favorably to the passage of the bill making a new county from Floyd and Polk, to be called Coosa. Passed.”
– Cassville Standard, Dec. 17, 1857

CROMARTIE

“The proposed new county to be created at Hazlehurst has been christened “Cromartie,” in honor of Hon. John A. Cromartie, who introduced the constitutional amendment. It is a fit honor to a deserving man.”
– Tifton Gazette, March 31, 1905

“Jeff Davis county (applied for by the name of Cromartie) with Hazlehurst as the county site, to be formed from Appling and Coffee.
– Vienna News, Aug. 11, 1905

“They made Cromartie county; that is correct. Cromartie introduced the bill and should have a county named for him. Hazlehurst is a nice town and should be a county seat and a county is needed just where this one has been formed. It is all right.”
– Waycross Evening Herald, Aug. 12, 1905

DEADWYLER

“On notion of Mr. Harris, of Clarke, the regular order was suspended, to take up the bill for the creation of a new county out of the counties of Franklin and Elbert, to be called “Deadwyler.” The bill was put on its passage and lost.
– Rome Courier, Jan. 22, 1852

DIXIE

Proposed with Millen as county seat. Mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner.

Scheduled to be heard July 19, 1905
– Macon Telegraph, July 14, 1905

EVANS

“Three projects for the creation of new counties are being agitated at this session of the legislature. One is to create Evans county out of parts of Decatur and Early counties. Another is to form Griggs county from parts of Worth, Colquitt and Mitchell counties. The third is to carve Henderson county from Appling, Pierce and Wayne counties.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 15, 1911

“Stonewall, Evans and Hampton counties have been turned down.”
– Eatonton Messenger, July 19, 1913

Note: Hampton likely a misprint of Hansell, which was being debated in 1913.

GEORGIA

“The other proposed new counties, Blackshear, with Scott as its county seat; Cleveland, with Soperton as its county seat, and Georgia, with Metter as its county seat, do not ask so much of Emanuel.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 6, 1908

“Senator Hawes offered an amendment naming the proposed new county “Lanier” in place of “Georgia.”

“The amendment changing the name from “Georgia” to “Lanier,” after Georgia’s great poet, was carried.

The bill for the proposed county of “Georgia” was lost, the vote being ayes 20 and nays 19, a two-thirds vote being necessary for a constitutional amendment.
– Atlanta Georgian and News, Aug. 6, 1908

GRIGGS

Proposed county to have Arlington as the county seat. Mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner.

“Said county is to be created from parts of Colquitt, Worth and Mitchell counties.”
– Tifton Gazette, Dec. 23, 1910, from the Doerun Advertiser

Proposal to create was read in the House of Representatives.
– Atlanta Georgian and News, Aug. 18, 1911

“Doerun is renewing the contest for Griggs County. Haven’t yet heard anything from the Hansell County project.”
– Daily Times Enterprise (Thomasville), May 4, 1914

HANSELL

Proposed county to have Meigs as county seat. Ochlocknee would be included, with the northern boundary set a mile from Pelham:  “The north line of Hansell county, as carved out by Meigs, comes up within a mile of Pelham, leaving that place in Mitchell county. It had been figured out that Pelham would recognize this slight and oppose the proposition and that Meigs would not be willing to let Pelham in on the deal for fear of losing the county site.”
– Thomasville Times-Enterprise, July 8, 1913

“The proposed amendments to the constitution for the creation of Griggs county, with Doerun as the county seat, and Hansell county, with Pelham as the county seat, were voted down by the lower house of the general assembly last week by a vote of 94 to 41 and 96 to 22 respectively. The backers of the new county movements may renew the fight at the next session of the legislature.”
– Tifton Gazette, July 24, 1914

HARDEMAN

“By Senator Cromartie, of the Third district – A bill to create a new county of Hardeman out of Appling, Pierce and Ware counties.
– Atlanta Georgian and News, June 7, 1911; bills in the senate

“The Board of Trade was today invited to send a delegation to a meeting to be held at Alma on Friday on the Hardeman county movement. The meeting will be attended by a large number of people who are directly interested in the proposition and the letter received by the board stated that Alma was very anxious for Waycross to have representatives at [ends there]”
– Waycross Journal, Feb. 28, 1913

“Even opponents of new counties frankly admitted that on presented facts and as a necessity Bacon county was the best proposition of the kind before the legislature. It will be created out of Appling, Pierce and Ware, three-fourths coming from Appling. Alma will be the county seat. Originally, the county was named Hardeman, but its advocates determined to change the name to Bacon in honor of the late Senator A.O. Bacon, which undoubtedly won it additional friends in both houses.”
– Weekly Times-Recorder, July 23, 1914

HAYNE

“A bill to lay out a new county, from Stewart and Randolph, to be called Hayne, has passed the Senate; yeas 57, nays 31.”
– Cassville Standard, Nov. 18, 1858

1905-06-09 Tifton Gazette
This hand-drawn map from the June 9, 1905 Tifton Gazette contains two counties that had proposed names, but never existed with them. Henderson County was proposed with Ashburn as the county seat. Henderson was changed to Turner, which does currently exist. To its east was the proposed Northen County, possibly named for the (still living at that time) ex-Governor, William Northen. Fitzgerald citizens also got their wish, Ben Hill County being created a year later.

HENDERSON

“It is proposed to make Henderson county out of portions of Dooley [sic], Wilcox, Irwin and Worth counties, with Ashburn as the county seat. It is declared that the residents of the portions of the counties to be used for creating the new county are favorable to the plan and that when the proposition is presented to the legislature next June, there will not be a dissenting element.”
– Augusta Chronicle, March 20, 1905

“Three projects for the creation of new counties are being agitated at this session of the legislature. One is to create Evans county out of parts of Decatur and Early counties. Another is to form Griggs county from parts of Worth, Colquitt and Mitchell counties. The third is to carve Henderson county from Appling, Pierce and Wayne counties.
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 15, 1911

HOWELL

“Atlanta, Ga., April 3 – One of the most interesting new county proposals ever submitted to the legislature will be that of Howell county, to be introduced in the session next summer, providing for the creation of a county from a northern strip of Dooly and a southern strip of Houston counties, with the enterprising town of Unadilla as the county seat.”
– Post-Search Light, April 5, 1917

JAMES

“James, from Emmanuel [sic], Johnson, Montgomery and Laurens, with Adrian as the site.”
– Union Recorder (Milledgeville), May 9, 1905

New bills introduced
“By Mr. Atkinson of Emanuel – To create new county of James from territory of Emanuel, Johnson, Laurens and Montgomery, county seat to be the town of Adrian.”
– Athens Banner, July 9, 1915

“Atlanta, July 20. – The constitutional amendments committee this afternoon recommended that the proposed new county, Treutlin [sic], do not pass, that the bill proposing James county do not pass.”
– Tifton Gazette, July 23, 1915

JEFF DAVIS

Proposed with Barnesville as county seat. Mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner. Referred to as just Davis in May 2, 1905, Columbus Daily Enquirer.

JENKINS

The Legislature:
“In the House, the greater part of the day was devoted to the bill proposing to create a new county, to be composed of a portion of Cass and some other contiguous counties. In the course of the action of the House upon it, an incident occurred worthy of notice. Several names were proposed for the county county, Clay, Polk, Nelson, Hardee &c. &c. ultimately a [W]hig member proposed “Jenkins” in compliment to the gentleman of that name now a member of the House; the motion was seconded on the democratic side of the House and immediately adopted. It is gratifying to see party asperity paying its homage to moral worth. The bill was ultimately lost.”
– Federal Union-Extra (Milledgeville), Nov. 30, 1849

“A Mr. Thomas of the state legislature has introduced a bill for Jenkins County, to be created out of Coweta, Fayette and Meriwether. The LaGrange Reporter is not in favor, as “the counties in Georgia have already been cut up until some of them are ridiculously small.”
– LaGrange Reporter, Jan. 18, 1877

The bill about a new Jenkins County, out of Coweta, Fayette and Meriwether was withdrawn Feb. 13, 1877.
– Journal of the Georgia House of Representatives

KELL

Proposed new counties
“Kell – Of Tattnall and Liberty.”
– Macon Telegraph, July 23, 1905

KENT

Bills introduced
“By Mr. Kent, of Montgomery – To create new county of Kent.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 24, 1911

“Wheeler county will be formed of that portion of Montgomery county, west of the Oconee river, and will have Alamo as its county seat. It was first proposed to name this county “Kent” in honor of the father of Representative Kent, a pioneer settler, who still lives there, but the senate decided against this and selected Wheeler.”
– Weekly Times-Recorder, Aug. 8, 1912

LAMAR

New House bills
“By Mr. Spence, of Mitchell – To create new county of Lamar from portions of Early, Calhoun and Baker counties, with Arlington as the county seat.”
– Athens Banner, July 30, 1915

“Two delegations contesting for the name of “Lamar” for proposed new counties put in their appearance here today. Dr. W.E. Sanders and J.S. Cowart, of Arlington, are in rooms 202-4 Kimball house, with headquarters for a “Lamar” county to be carved from Calhoun, Early and Baker counties. C.C. Duncan, of Unadilla, has opened headquarters in rooms 302-4 for a “Lamar” county to be carved from Dooly and Houston counties.”
– Macon Telegraph, June, 27, 1916

“There will be a mass meeting at the Court House Vienna Saturday morning June 17th, at 10 o’clock for the purpose of discussing the proposed new county of Lamar. The object of this meeting is to allow the people from all the parts of Dooly county to express their sentiments in regard to the proposed county division. Those people living or owning property within the territory that would be taken from Dooly are especially requested to be present.”
– Vienna News, June 15, 1916

“The citizens of Dooly in Vienna and thereabouts are being invited to attend a mass meeting on the question of a new county of Lamar for Unadilla. The great state of Houston is also casting about for an answer to those who come “landgrabbing” for the new county. It would be a fine thing if Dooly and Houston could be generous and neighborly with the new aspirants. The proposed new county would help a large number in and around Unadilla and do little harm outside. – Cordele Dispatch.”
– Vienna News, June 22, 1916

LANIER

Name change from proposed name of Georgia, to have had Metter as the county seat.
– Atlanta Georgian and News, Aug. 6, 1908

LAWTON

In the House:
“By Mr. Alderman – To create a new county called Lawton from Thomas and Decatur.”
– Savannah Morning News, Jan. 26, 1875

MATTHEWS

Bills reported:
“The bill to create a new county to be called Matthews, from the county of Baker was passed.”
– Federal Union (Milledgeville), Dec. 13, 1853

McDONALD

Land would have been taken from (at least) Newton, Gwinnett and Henry counties. Newton residents were apparently fine with the county being divided, while the latter two were not.

– Southern Recorder (Milledgeville), Dec. 6, 1859

MERCER

Editorial correspondence of The Patriot, from Milledgeville:
“The majority of the committee to whom was referred the bill to create a new county from parts of Baker, Lee, Dooly and Irwin counties, agreed to strike out Lee from the bill, and to name the new county “Mercer,” after REV. JESSE MERCER. Strong efforts are being made for the passage of the bill; but I hope it will not succeed against the wishes of the majority of the people from the county. It has been made the special order for to-morrow.”
– Albany Patriot, Dec. 5, 1851

MILLEDGE

House Bills on Third Reading.

“To lay out a new county from the counties of Chattooga and Walker (to be called Milledge). Mr Patton made some remarks, as to the population, resources, & c., of the proposed new county, of the difficulties of these people attending their Courts – these people were surrounded on three sides by mountains and were compelled to travel 18 miles to get a distance of 7 miles – he came here untrammeled – he was disinterested in this measure, only as his constituents felt interested. The right of petition should be respected – to counter petition was here against this – he had voted an appropriation to build a bridge in the low country – not as a benefit to a locality, but for the good of the whole people. He had not troubled the House with speeches and he hoped it would be patient with him. [He made an able vindication of the bill.]”
– Daily Federal Union (Milledgeville), Dec. 2, 1859

Proposed at July 12, 1905 joint meeting of the house and senate standing committee on new counties. To have been heard July 24.
– Vienna News, July 14, 1905

“SWAINSBORO, Ga., July 6. – A special train brought a large number of Adrian citizens to Swainsboro Saturday to participate in a meeting called by Emanuel’s citizens who oppose dividing the county to consider the various new county movements which have materialized in the form of bills in the legislature. The proposed county of Milledge, with Adrian as its county site, seems to be most insistent upon “swiping” Emanuel’s territory, the line of this proposed county running within six miles of the court house at this place.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 6, 1908

“The senate has recommended only one new county, Milledge.”
– LaGrange Reporter, July 25, 1913

NELSON

Legislative Proceedings.
Senate.
“Mr. Byrd of Gordon, to lay out a new county from Gordon, Cass, Cherokee, Pickens and Gilmer, to be called Nelson.”
– Cassville Standard, Dec. 2, 1858

NICHOLLS

“BILLS INTRODUCED ON FIRST READING
Mr. Kirkland – To create a new county to be called Nicholls, and taken from Appling, Coffee, Ware, and Pierce.”
– Savannah Morning News, Jan. 31, 1874

“Editors Constitution: There is a bill pending in the Legislature to create a new county to be named Nicholls, the territory for which is to be taken from the counties of Appling, Coffee and Ware.

By looking at the map it can be readily be seen where the new county will be situated, and that what has been said is true. The boundaries are as follows: Commencing at the mouth of the seventeen mile creek, thence up said creek to the old Coffee road, thence along said road to the Ocmulgee river, thence down said river to the line of Appling, thence along said line to the Big Hurrican creek, thence down said creek to the line of Pierce, thence along said line to the Great Satilla river, thence up said river to the mouth of the seventeen mile creek.”

– Savannah Morning News, Feb. 9, 1874 (from the Atlanta Constitution)

“Three senate and four house bills were passed and four new ones introduced. Senator Sirmans introduced, by request, a bill to create a new county out of Coffee, Appling and Ware. It is proposed to name the new county Nicholls, after Captain John C. Nicholls.”
– Atlanta Georgian, July 20, 1906

NORTHEN

Proposed at July 12, 1905 joint meeting of the house and senate standing committee on new counties. To have been heard July 17.
– Vienna News, July 14, 1905

Fitzgerald citizens were disappointed in August 1905 that Northen County was dropped from a list of proposed new counties.
– Macon Telegraph, Aug. 12, 1905

“It is also claimed that the proposed new county of Northern [sic] with Nicholls as the county seat remains to be settled and that the position of Waycross has been that before any territory would be granted to Hardeman the Northen proposition would have to be settled.”
– Waycross Journal, July 25, 1913

PERKINS

“HOUSE

Mr. Higdon – A bill to organize a new county within the limits of Decatur county, to be called Perkins county.”
-LaGrange Reporter, Jan. 22, 1869

SATILLA

“Representative Ward (by request) has introduced a bill in the house to to create the new county of Satilla, with Willacoochee as the county site. It is proposed to take slices out of Coffee, Berrien and Clinch to create Satilla county.”
– Atlanta Georgian and News, July 13, 1907

SCOTT

Bills Reported
“The bill to create a new county from the counties of Early and Randolph to be called ‘Scott.'”
– Federal Union (Milledgeville), Jan. 24, 1854

SHIELDS

Matter Introduced
“By Mr. Taylor of Dooly: A bill to lay out a new county, from the counties of Worth and Dooly, to be called Shields.”
– Cassville Standard, Dec. 17, 1857

STAPLETON

Senate:
“A bill to create a new county of the name of Stapleton, by a division of Jefferson county – referred to the Judiciary Committee.”
– Southern Recorder (Milledgeville), Nov. 14, 1871, from the Macon Telegraph

STEPHENS

Georgia Legislature proceedings yesterday in the senate:
“The bill to create a new county by the division of Jefferson, to be called Stephens. Referred to the Committee on Counties and New County Lines.”
– Savannah Morning News, Dec. 2, 1871

Proposed with Winder as county seat. Mentioned in June 29, 1905 Athens Banner.

Proposed at July 12, 1905 joint meeting of the house and senate standing committee on new counties. One, which seems to infer it was to be drawn from Montgomery County, was set to go July 19. Another, drawn from Bulloch County, was to have been heard July 26.
– Macon Telegraph, July 14, 1905

Proposed New Counties
“Stephens – Of Walton, Jackson and Gwinnett.”
– Macon Telegraph, July 23, 1905

STONEWALL

“One of the movements which has assumed a definite shape and has behind it some of the strong influences is that which proposes to create the new county of Stonewall out of portions of Emanuel and Tattnall, with Stillmore as the county site.

Stillmore is one of the livest and most progressive towns in Southeast Georgia and its people have long desired that independence which would come from having a county of their own. They have gone at it this time more thoroughly in earnest than ever before. They have organized a working force with Hon. T.J. Kent as president, Dr. R.E. Graham vice president, Dr. J.R. Warner secretary and Hon. W.J. Evans treasurer. Committees have also been appointed to deal with every possible phase of the case.

Several mass meetings have been held in Stillmore and rural districts to be affected by the proposed new county. Contributions of all amounts from 5 cents up are being received from nearly every section of the new territory to aid in defraying the expenses of advertising. Stillmore is situated practically in the center of the proposed new county territory; has three railroads, each of which has a double daily passenger service, and is well equipped for a new county site.”
– Athens Banner, April 30, 1913

“Stonewall, Evans and Hampton counties have been turned down.”
– Eatonton Messenger, July 19, 1913

Note: Hampton likely a misprint of Hansell, which was being debated in 1913.

TATE

“One is to be named Bacon in all probability, after the late Senator A.O. Bacon, with Alma, in Appling county, as the county seat. The other is in north Georgia, with Fairmount, in Gordon county, as the county seat. The Tate county folk say north Georgia has had one new county since 1885, Stephens. However, they are bringing more potent argument than that statement to bear on the legislature.”
– Weekly Times-Recorder, July 9, 1914

“Immediately following four other proposed new counties were killed – Truetlen [sic], Tate, Griggs and Hansell. Bacon comes up for final passage in the senate on this date, and there seems to be no doubt whatever that it will pass the upper house by as safe a margin as it received in the house.”
– Weekly Times-Recorder, July 23, 1914

TOOKE

“TOOKE COUNTY.
Mr. Bush moved that the rules be suspended and the bill to create a new county out of the counties of Thomas and Decatur read the second time and referred to the Committee on New Counties, which motion prevailed.”
– Weekly Constitution (Atlanta), Jan. 27, 1874

“Mr. Lyon’s bill to lay out a new county to be called Tooke county was tabled on account of his absence.”
– Weekly Constitution (Atlanta), Feb. 10, 1874

Listed under House bills read:
“To create a new county to be called Tooke. Lost.”
– Weekly Constitution (Atlanta), Feb. 17, 1874

WARNER

“This new proposition is Warner County, which it is proposed to carve out of sections of Meriwether, Harris and Talbot Counties , with Manchester as the county seat. The new county would also take in the famous resort, Warm Springs.”
– Augusta Chronicle, June 20, 1913

New House bills
“By Mr. Conner, of Spalding – To create new county of Warner from portions of Meriwether, Talbot and Harris counties, with Manchester as the county seat.”
– Athens Banner, July 30, 1915

WILSON

“It is understood that people at Aline have already subscribed more than $3,000 for a courthouse, in case Wilson county is created, with Aline as county seat.”

Three counties have supposedly been proposed within a six-mile radius of Stillmore.
– Macon Telegraph, June 22, 1913

“Four new county propositions are on the slate: Treutlen, Cook, Wilson (which used to be called Peach in the early agitation), and Atkinson.”
– Milledgeville News, July 6, 1917

“Atlanta, July 10 – A bill for the creation of Wilson County was introduced in the Legislature today by L.L. Brown, one of the members from Houston, who was elected on the new county platform.

The name selected is in honor of our President. The proposed new county takes 178 square miles from Houston and 27 square miles from Macon County, which area is owned and farmed by people residing in Fort Valley, the county site selected for the new county.”
– Milledgeville News, July 13, 1917

WINSTED

Senate bills on first reading
“Mr. Anderson – To create a new county from Troup and Harris, called Winsted.”
– Weekly Atlanta Intelligencer, Feb. 3, 1869

YONAH

Senate
Afternoon Session
“A bill to lay out a new county from Habersham and Lumpkin, to be called Yonah. Lost.”
– Cassville Standard, Dec. 17, 1857

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